While There’s a Microphone in Our Hands

We’ve all read the stories and seen the news clips. We all know about the trillions of gallons of water that flooded Texas. We know that Florida residents have been displaced, some killed. We know that the building materials which covered natural flood mitigation landscapes kept the water above ground. Some of our ASAP members are experiencing this personally. Our thoughts are with them.

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Censorship: The Enemy of Science

 

The Guardian reported Monday that United States Department of Agriculture staffers received instructions to remove any language referencing climate change. Mere hours after the Guardian posted their article, The New York Times preemptively released the most recent draft of the Climate Change Report, a key part of the fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4), which details the predicted effects of climate change and the hazards we already face from climate change today.

On both sides of this problem, the action results from the fear of being without power: for USDA leaders, this is the loss of political power, and for climate scientists, this is the inability to do what is right for the public. (more…)

Stakes and Temperatures Rise Together in Southern States

In our July 14 newsletter, ASAP Managing Director Beth Gibbons examined the uncertainties of a recent economic study on the effects of climate change produced by the Climate Impact Lab. Here, ASAP Intern Mary Winn Granum shares another take on the impact of CIL’s findings.

 

In the June 30 issue of Science, a study led by the Climate Impact Lab indicated that the economy  would suffer greater losses in Southern states, where rising temperatures would create more extreme, less habitable conditions. The study, “Estimating economic damage from climate change in the United States,” designed a systematic framework for examining impacts down to a county level to process data more precisely than that of federal and state impact estimates.

Looking ahead to 2080, the hottest regions in the country – some of which contain the poorest counties in the country – may suffer losses up to 20% of GDP per year due to severe weather and other climate-related damages. Although these projections are still years in the future, practitioners must work now to mitigate such devastation to these communities. (more…)

Baby Out With the Stormwater? Congress’ Chance to Fix the NFIP

Photo Credit: NASA

 

For homeowners in flood-prone regions, July means two crucial things: hurricane season is here, and there are only three months left to chart the future of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

(more…)

Strength in Local Leadership

Together, we can create the future we envision. Photo credit: @benjaminthacker

We are the American Society of Adaptation Professionals. Every day, we change and adapt, responding to threats imminent and distant, to create a better future. Yesterday, we were handed a new challenge. Today, it’s time for us to do what we do best—adapt. (more…)

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San Francisco Wins 2017 Prize for Progress in Adaptation

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Congratulations to the City and County of San Francisco!

Winner of the 2017 ASAP Prize for Progress in Adaptation

The American Society of Adaptation professionals has awarded the City and County of San Francisco the 2017 Prize for Progress at the Annual Adaptation Awards in St. Paul, Minnesota as a pre-National Adaptation Forum event.

Under the direction of Democratic Mayor Ed Lee, San Francisco created the city’s first official policy directing its response to the threat of sea level rise: Guidance for Incorporating Sea Level Rise into Capital Planning in San Francisco: Assessing Vulnerability and Risk to Support Adaptation.

Developed by a multi-agency committee led by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, the policy has been an effective tool for evaluating the sea level rise vulnerability of capital investments in the city’s Ten-Year Capital Plan. Since adoption in 2014, the guidance has led to the modification of several capital projects in the city.

Learn more about the guidance in the 2017 Prize for Progress Winner Snapshot.

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Prize for Progress Award Winner Announced

 

Contact: Beth Gibbons, American Society of Adaptation Professionals, Managing Director

EMAIL: [email protected]

PHONE: 202-904-9946

Prize for Progress Award Winner Announced

American Society of Adaptation Professionals Honors City and County of San Francisco

St. Paul, Minn. — May 9, 2017 — The American Society of Adaptation Professionals (ASAP) awarded its 2017 Prize for Progress to the City and County of San Francisco for groundbreaking work incorporating sea level rise into capital planning.

“The Prize for Progress honors the important adaptation work of communities and groups—like the City and County of San Francisco—who are taking action now to protect human lives and natural systems against the immediate and long-term effects of climate change,” said ASAP Managing Director Beth Gibbons. “By highlighting this innovative work and sharing these success stories, we hope to improve and accelerate climate adaptation efforts across the country.”

San Francisco is the second recipient of this biannual prize, which recognizes innovative communities and organizations taking leadership in decreasing the vulnerability of human and natural systems to climate change.

The Bay Area is projected to see a rise in sea levels of between 36-66 inches by 2100, threatening roads, water treatment plants, San Francisco and Oakland airports, as well as homes and businesses.

Under the direction of Democratic Mayor Ed Lee, San Francisco created the city’s first official policy directing its response to the threat of sea level rise: Guidance for Incorporating Sea Level Rise into Capital Planning in San Francisco: Assessing Vulnerability and Risk to Support Adaptation.

Developed by a multi-agency committee led by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, the policy has been an effective tool for evaluating the sea level rise vulnerability of capital investments in the city’s Ten-Year Capital Plan. Since adoption in 2014, the guidance has led to the modification of several capital projects in the city.

 Gibbons presented the 2017 Prize for Progress to the City and County of San Francisco at the Adaptation Award Ceremony hosted by ASAP as a pre-National Adaptation Forum event. Four runners-up, the Huron River Watershed Council, The Conservation Fund, Menominee Tribal Enterprises and the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, were also recognized for their innovation and leadership in the field of climate adaptation.

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About the American Society of Adaptation Professionals

ASAP connects and supports climate adaptation professionals while advancing innovation and excellence in the field of climate change adaptation. ASAP’s membership spans 48 states, over 1000 members and over 400 organizations. ASAP to connect people across sectors, scales, and geographies is makes the organization uniquely qualified for scaling best practices, setting national standards, serving as the voice of the profession, and providing a broad and deep community to professionals in the adaptation field and all climate-impacted people. ASAP is supported by the Institute for Sustainable Communities with funding from the MacArthur Foundation. Learn more at https://adaptationprofessionals.org

About the Institute for Sustainable Communities

An international nonprofit organization, the Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC) has 26 years of practical experience working with local leaders. ISC’s programs are designed to facilitate peer learning and engagement among local leaders charged with the work of making their communities more sustainable. ISC’s innovative EHS programs are public-private partnerships that have trained more than 35,000 factory managers from more than 11,700 suppliers and 150 brands. ISC has led 108 projects in 30 countries, and currently works in China, India, Bangladesh and the United States. Learn more at iscvt.org

Communication and Engagement Intern

The American Society of Adaptation Professionals (ASAP) is seeking a 20 hour/week intern to support the development of climate adaptation resources for its diverse membership of adaptation professionals across the United States. ASAP helps build essential climate resilience for communities across the country by focusing on connecting and supporting the individual adaptation professionals. ASAP provides a platform for climate adaptation leaders to interact, share what’s working, and collaborate with their colleagues. ASAP is headquartered in Ypsilanti, MI with administrative support through the Institute for Sustainable Communities, in Montpelier, VT.

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