People & History

We Are “The People People”

ASAP’s Mission is to support and connect climate adaptation professionals while advancing innovation in the field of practice.

Adaptation professionals across North America are connecting on ASAP. See what people are saying about the benefits of being a member.

Megan OGrady - Stratus Consulting
Megan O’Grady | Stratus Consulting
Boulder, CO

“ASAP helps me stay on top of the innovations in the adaptation field so I can tailor my knowledge to fit clients’ needs.”

Lisa Lin - City of Houston
Lisa Lin | City of Houston
Houston, TX

“I joined ASAP to learn about the latest efforts in adaptation planning in other cities.”

Ben Alexander - Headwaters Economics
Ben Alexander | Headwaters Economics
Bozeman, MT

“ASAP provides the quickest way for me to stay networked and keep up with the best adaptation science and practice.”

John Bolduc - City of Cambridge
John Bolduc | City of Cambridge
Cambridge, MA

“ASAP connects me with emerging practice of planning and preparing for climate change, which is an urgent matter for all of us.”

Susanne Moser - Moser Research and Consulting
Susanne Moser | Moser Research & Consulting
Santa Cruz, CA

“It’s people who create change. That’s why I am a member of ASAP.”

Missy Stults | University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI

“The opportunity ASAP provides to meaningfully engage with thought leaders and practical experts in adaptation is unparalleled.”

The ASAP Story

Read about the beginnings of ASAP and learn more about how our vision of connecting adaptation professionals became a realty.

  • ASAP Begins:

    Professionals across the United States are working to prepare for the impacts of climate change and make their communities, regions, states, and the country more resilient to those changes. For each, the story is different but similar. These individuals realize that climate change is one of the most critical issues of our time and that it will affect many aspects of their jobs and our communities. They work within their sector and across sectors. They focus on climate science, public health, natural resources, governance, urban planning, transportation, forestry, water resources and more. They realize that while their individual efforts can make a difference, they cannot do it alone. They look for a place to find and share information, enhance promising practices, and collaborate on building a healthy and vibrant future. In many ways, their work is the foundation from which ASAP was formed in 2011. It’s a story worth remembering….

    It was a dark night and the fittingly named Dark Horse Saloon in Boulder, Colorado. And yes, like Guy Noire, a group of two dozen of the Adaptation Vanguard were asking themselves some of life’s most persistent questions:

  • What are we going to do here that is worthwhile?

    What is the state of the field in Adaptation?

    What’s working?

    What’s not working?

    And, how can they make it better?

    This group had spent a long day trying to lay the groundwork for a climate preparedness and learning network, the latest in a sporatic series of meetings going back to 2009. They had made some progress but not been successful. Then, like many inspirational ideas before, the concept (and the name) of the American Society of Adaptation Professionals (ASAP) was drawn on a napkin.

  • “The People People”

    Huddled around a few tables, the group agreed what was needed was a home for people working on climate change adaptation. In fact, the longer they talked, the more they came to believe that at the heart of all innovation and change are people. Key people. Dedicated people. Smart people. Connected people. And that’s how ASAP became “the people people.”

    Professionals need a place to connect with each other, share information, and build on successes while moving away from approaches that aren’t working. They need a professional society that could help bridge the geographic and sectoral gaps that naturally develop, especially in the diverse, dynamic, and emerging field of climate adaptation. No longer would individuals be isolated working on their own to make a difference. No longer would the sectors be so fragmented in their approaches to building resilience. No longer would communities, regions, or states need to start from scratch to build and prioritize their strategies to increase climate resilience.

  • Thanks to the generous support of the Kresge Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, and the Institute for Sustainable Communities, that vision is now a reality. ASAP is the only organization that focuses solely on connecting and supporting the people who are building climate resilience across the country. Whatever your field, background, or expertise, ASAP is the premiere place to meet and connect with other professionals, get tips and updates on promising practices, stay up to date on the latest in climate adaptation, and share what you are learning from your work to build resilience.

  • ASAP Begins:

    Professionals across the United States are working to prepare for the impacts of climate change and make their communities, regions, states, and the country more resilient to those changes. For each, the story is different but similar. These individuals realize that climate change is one of the most critical issues of our time and that it will affect many aspects of their jobs and our communities. They work within their sector and across sectors. They focus on climate science, public health, natural resources, governance, urban planning, transportation, forestry, water resources and more. They realize that while their individual efforts can make a difference, they cannot do it alone. They look for a place to find and share information, enhance promising practices, and collaborate on building a healthy and vibrant future.

  • In many ways, their work is the foundation from which ASAP was formed in 2011. It’s a story worth remembering….

    It was a dark night and the fittingly named Dark Horse Saloon in Boulder, Colorado. And yes, like Guy Noire, a group of two dozen of the Adaptation Vanguard were asking themselves some of life’s most persistent questions:

  • What are we going to do here that is worthwhile?

    What is the state of the field in Adaptation?

    What’s working?

    What’s not working?

    And, how can they make it better?

    This group had spent a long day trying to lay the groundwork for a climate preparedness and learning network, the latest in a sporatic series of meetings going back to 2009. They had made some progress but not been successful. Then, like many inspirational ideas before, the concept (and the name) of the American Society of Adaptation Professionals (ASAP) was drawn on a napkin.

  • “The People People”

    Huddled around a few tables, the group agreed what was needed was a home for people working on climate change adaptation. In fact, the longer they talked, the more they came to believe that at the heart of all innovation and change are people. Key people. Dedicated people. Smart people. Connected people. And that’s how ASAP became “the people people.”

  • Professionals need a place to connect with each other, share information, and build on successes while moving away from approaches that aren’t working. They need a professional society that could help bridge the geographic and sectoral gaps that naturally develop, especially in the diverse, dynamic, and emerging field of climate adaptation. No longer would individuals be isolated working on their own to make a difference. No longer would the sectors be so fragmented in their approaches to building resilience. No longer would communities, regions, or states need to start from scratch to build and prioritize their strategies to increase climate resilience.

  • Thanks to the generous support of the Kresge Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, and the Institute for Sustainable Communities, that vision is now a reality. ASAP is the only organization that focuses solely on connecting and supporting the people who are building climate resilience across the country. Whatever your field, background, or expertise, ASAP is the premiere place to meet and connect with other professionals, get tips and updates on promising practices, stay up to date on the latest in climate adaptation, and share what you are learning from your work to build resilience.

    JOIN US!

 Board of Directors

Sharing a common goal of climate resilience, the ASAP Board of Directors provides leadership to ASAP Affinity Groups and supports the primary vision of our platform: connecting and supporting people.

Members of the ASAP Board of Directors

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Eric Mielbrecht | EcoAdapt

I am an EcoAdapt co-founder and specialize in assessing anthropogenic stresses and the risks they pose to the natural and built environment. I am particula... [Read More]

Steve Adams | Institute for Sustainable Communities

Lead for ISC\'s domestic adaptation portfolio which includes capacity building, field building and direct engagement projects around the US

Josh Foster | Climate Impacts Research Consortium

Josh has over 25 years of experience working on climate change science and policy in the federal and non-profit sectors including over 20 years working on ... [Read More]

Joyce Coffee | Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index

Joyce Coffee, Climate Resilience Consulting founder, has 20 years of domestic and international experience in the corporate, government and non-profit sect... [Read More]

Jennifer Jurado | BrowardCounty

Our Division coordinates environmental planning and community resilience initiatives for Broward County, FL on a regional basis through policy, planning, a... [Read More]

Jessica Grannis | Georgetown Climate Center

I work on the law and policy of coastal adaptation, and manage the adaptation program at the Georgetown Climate Center

Missy Stults | The University of Michigan

I am an independent contractor currently supporting the Science to Action Community of Practice, multiple Great Lakes cities with designing a universal vul... [Read More]

Official Sponsors of ASAP

The American Society of Adaptation Professionals is supported by the Institute for Sustainable Communities with funding from the Kresge Foundation and the MacArthur Foundation.

Institute for Sustainable
Communities

Bringing together best practices from the public & private sector, ISC uses creative, flexible training and mentoring to help communities produce breakthrough results.

ISCVT.ORG

The Kresge
Foundation

The Kresge Foundation is a private, national foundation that supports activities to help communities prepare for and limit the consequences of climate change.

KRESGE.ORG

MacArthur
Foundation

The MacArthur Foundation strengthens institutions, helps improve public policy, and proves the information to the public, primarily through support for public interest media.

MACFOUND.ORG

Partners in Adaptation

ASAP develops key partnerships with content providers to engage our membership with the latest news, events and opportunities in climate adaptation. Together, we are closing the gaps through partnership with new and existing providers.

INFORMATION INTEGRATION

Georgetown Climate Center

The nonpartisan Georgetown Climate Center seeks to advance effective climate, energy, and transportation policies in the United States – policies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help communities adapt to climate change.

INFORMATION INTEGRATION

Climate Access

Climate Access is a global network of climate and clean energy communicators, serving more than 2,000 members in 57 countries providing the knowledge that network practitioners need to take their communications to the next level.

INFORMATION INTEGRATION

usda-forest-service-climate-research-center-300

The Forest Service’s Climate Change Resource Center (CCRC) connects land managers across the United States with current, relevant science that can be used in climate change adaptation planning and implementation.

We know we’re better together.

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