Tagged: Coastal

Climate Ready Boston Coastal Resilience Tracker

The City of Boston, Massachusetts is implementing many coastal resilience projects through the Climate Ready Boston program. This project tracker maps and describes a number of these progressive approaches to coastal resilience. The projects included in this tool are recommendations from the coastal resilience solutions plans for East Boston, Charlestown and South Boston.

Mentorship Spotlight: Creative Thinking for DEI Solutions

In the latest episode of our ASAP Mentorship Program, we learn that a common theme that has come out of this mentorship pair’s discussions is the need for creative, out of the box thinking for solving complex problems. Vidya Balasubramanyam (Mentee) is a NOAA Coastal Management Fellow working in New Hampshire’s coastal communities. She leads the Smart Shorelines project to inform the siting and socialization of living shorelines in New Hampshire. Josh Foster (Mentor) is an adaptation consultant and active ASAP Board Member who has over 25 years of experience working on climate change science, policy, and adaptation in the federal and non-profit sectors.

Financing resilient communities and coastlines: How environmental impact bonds can accelerate wetland restoration in Louisiana and beyond

The Environmental Defense Fund and Quantified Ventures have assessed how an environmental impact bond (EIB) could effectively be used for coastal resilience financing for wetland restoration in Louisiana and other coastal areas. The report outlines the steps Louisiana would take to pilot and implement the EIB to restore the coast and wetlands, while greatly reducing land loss to sea level rise, and incentivizing investment. The framework could also support financing other natural infrastructure projects that build coastal resiliency, and serves as a template for coastal investments anywhere.

Financing resilient communities and coastlines: How environmental impact bonds can accelerate wetland restoration in Louisiana and beyond

The Environmental Defense Fund and Quantified Ventures have assessed how an environmental impact bond (EIB) could effectively be used for coastal resilience financing for wetland restoration in Louisiana and other coastal areas. The report outlines the steps Louisiana would take to pilot and implement the EIB to restore the coast and wetlands, while greatly reducing land loss to sea level rise, and incentivizing investment. The framework could also support financing other natural infrastructure projects that build coastal resiliency, and serves as a template for coastal investments anywhere.

Building Gulf Coast Resilience – Opportunities After Deepwater Horizon

From the Georgetown Climate Center, this report presents recommendations for enhancing Gulf Coast resilience as state and federal agencies implement projects to restore ecosystems affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Over 134 million gallons of crude oil was released into the Gulf of Mexico affecting 1,300 miles of coastline from Texas to Florida. Over the next 15 years, more than $20 billion will flow to the region for projects to restore ecosystems and economies affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. And the success of this grand experiment in coastal restoration will have importance for not only the Gulf Coast region, but also the nation as a whole. The Gulf economy contributes $234 billion to the nation’s gross domestic product and the region is home to biologically and economically important habitats and fisheries. The region has a unique opportunity to both restore spill-affected ecosystems and enhance community resilience to the impacts of climate change. However, implementing the ambitious and innovative portfolio of projects will require improved coordination among state and federal agencies and expedited processes for reviewing and permitting projects. 

Building Gulf Coast Resilience – Opportunities After Deepwater Horizon

From the Georgetown Climate Center, this report presents recommendations for enhancing Gulf Coast resilience as state and federal agencies implement projects to restore ecosystems affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Over 134 million gallons of crude oil was released into the Gulf of Mexico affecting 1,300 miles of coastline from Texas to Florida. Over the next 15 years, more than $20 billion will flow to the region for projects to restore ecosystems and economies affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. And the success of this grand experiment in coastal restoration will have importance for not only the Gulf Coast region, but also the nation as a whole. The Gulf economy contributes $234 billion to the nation’s gross domestic product and the region is home to biologically and economically important habitats and fisheries. The region has a unique opportunity to both restore spill-affected ecosystems and enhance community resilience to the impacts of climate change. However, implementing the ambitious and innovative portfolio of projects will require improved coordination among state and federal agencies and expedited processes for reviewing and permitting projects. 

Building Gulf Coast Resilience – Opportunities After Deepwater Horizon

From the Georgetown Climate Center, this report presents recommendations for enhancing Gulf Coast resilience as state and federal agencies implement projects to restore ecosystems affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Over 134 million gallons of crude oil was released into the Gulf of Mexico affecting 1,300 miles of coastline from Texas to Florida. Over the next 15 years, more than $20 billion will flow to the region for projects to restore ecosystems and economies affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. And the success of this grand experiment in coastal restoration will have importance for not only the Gulf Coast region, but also the nation as a whole. The Gulf economy contributes $234 billion to the nation’s gross domestic product and the region is home to biologically and economically important habitats and fisheries. The region has a unique opportunity to both restore spill-affected ecosystems and enhance community resilience to the impacts of climate change. However, implementing the ambitious and innovative portfolio of projects will require improved coordination among state and federal agencies and expedited processes for reviewing and permitting projects. 

Building Gulf Coast Resilience – Opportunities After Deepwater Horizon

From the Georgetown Climate Center, this report presents recommendations for enhancing Gulf Coast resilience as state and federal agencies implement projects to restore ecosystems affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Over 134 million gallons of crude oil was released into the Gulf of Mexico affecting 1,300 miles of coastline from Texas to Florida. Over the next 15 years, more than $20 billion will flow to the region for projects to restore ecosystems and economies affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Underwater: Rising Seas, Chronic Floods, and the Implications for US Coastal Real Estate 

The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) researched the impact of sea level rise tidal flooding on coastal real estate, for the entire coastline of the lower 48 states. The study identified the number of residential and commercial properties at risk of chronic inundation, including the total current property value, estimated population, and property tax base affected. UCS determines that some coastal real estate markets will not likely recover under high future GHG emissions scenarios in which sea levels rise greatly; and the number of properties facing chronic inundation is much reduced under low emissions scenarios. Interactive maps are available that show the results of this study, including how many homes are at risk by state, community, and ZIP Code.